A Letter to Pat Conroy

My Dearest Pat, March 8th, 2016 Read and Edited by Maggie Schein, Written by Bernie Schein. Maggie’s Intro: My father –or one of them (I must be a terribly difficult daughter to need two such father figures) –Bernie Schein, is in Venice right now with my mother, which is a good thing. I am not sure his heart would have survived this. Forever competitive, Bernie wanted to be in Heaven too, with his best friend and his soul mate – his proof to naysayers and skeptics of love, that time, enough salted tears, hearty hugs, fierce fights,  and life lived truly together forges of elements  of connection that can’t be destroyed by anything.  Not even death. Not even geography. From his heaven on earth in Venice, he asked me to read this letter to pat, and for you all, from him.  Wish me luck. Bernie’s Letter: My dearest Pat, I know we’ve said goodbye to each other more times in the last several weeks than either one of us might have imagined only a short time ago. Such is the nature of the obsessive-compulsive Jew who can’t let go and an Irish Catholic blowhard with a heart so big I imagine it now dwarfing the universe. They’ll love you up there: Peg and Don, Stannie, Mom and Dad, Gene, Doug, Tommy, Nancy Jane, all your loved ones. You’re regaling all of them right now, I have no doubt, they’re so happy to see you. You had to have been dying to see them, since you did. Frankly, my guess is your arrival on the scene at St. Peter’s has...

October 27, 2015 Event

Branch Library Event Tuesday, October 27, 2015 at 1:00pm Beaufort Branch Library, 311 Scott Street, Beaufort, SC 29902 Meet Bernie and rattle your funny bone with his stories of growing up and living in Beaufort, serving both as a teacher and an Administrator in schools, writing Famous All Over Town, and of course, being close friends with Pat Conroy. Book signing to follow. Copies will be available for purchase. Price of the Event: Free Contact Information: Traci Cox, 843-255-6431, tcox@bcgov.net Website:...

More about “Trigger Points” in Schools

Not only  are “TRIGGER POINTS” censorship, they’re bullying. Most kids are dying to find out who they really are, inside. They want to know who they were so they can find out who they are. I remember thinking that back when I was in sixth grade, because I was short and skinny and chicken shit the school greaser in his leather jacket and ducktail bullied me and wanted to beat me up. He did. But a decade later, writing about it, I remembered why. I was a total obnoxious wise-ass. I had bullied him, taunting him unmercifully: “Ha ha. I’m smart, and you’re stupid.” Silly stuff, stupid stuff like that. “You have to say, ‘Bernie can beat me up, or I’ll tell Mrs. Christensen (the teacher) you cheated off my paper.’ ” That memory was in fact empowering, as well as enlightening. So where did my big mouth come from? What was the difference really between that and his thug-attitude? When Sergeant Bernie pinned on his safety patrol badge, guess who had to cross the street last? You got it. He couldn’t wait to beat me up. Who, in retrospect, could blame him? The whole thing, looking back, strikes me as quite funny, quite human. I wonder if, in retrospect, he would see it that way. The action between us I think he would. But was a more serious trauma behind his general attitude? I don’t know, but to one degree or another, We’re all victims, we’re all bullies, all human. The purpose of an education is to learn . That’s our right. The real bullies: “Trigger Points”.  They’re...

‘Trigger Points’ in the Teaching of Literature

A false alarm is being sounded in literature classes: “Avoid unnecessary ‘Trigger Points’, provide ‘trigger warnings’ to students.” What is a ‘trigger’? According to the policy, thankfully being re-examined, at Oberlin, “a ‘trigger’ is ‘something’ that recalls a traumatic event to an individual…’anything’ could be a trigger.” To help the student identify and release “trigger points” was not only one of the major purposes of my junior high literature classes, but also my writing classes. The trigger points, unrealized, if at play only subconsciously, are the culprits behind not only “reader’s block” but “writer’s block”, to say nothing of self-destructive behavior. Trigger Points are inspired by real and important fears, but they are finally love-killers, “blocking”, if you will, fogging up the view not only of ourselves, but also of the people around us. The purpose of literature is to help us all “To Thine Own Selves Be True”, profoundly true, so that whatever wisdom we have can flourish and grow. Otherwise, it won’t, and we all suffer. Denial is self-censorship, and it is more destructive than any provincial reactionary school board. If those trigger points go unchecked for too long, all of us are in danger. As much as we all personally hate pain of any kind at all and will avoid it at all costs—at least I will—if we’re acting like assholes, and don’t know why, we’re going to scapegoat or blame others whether they deserve it or not. Ironically, it often happens right in the middle of literature class. The student too passive and withdrawn in class discussions who blames her low evaluation on the eager,...